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20131202
20131210
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the competing noise in the radio environment to get your call through. >> we use an array of antennas and some really smart computers, and what they do is, when we transmit, we send the information only to your phone. >> you mean there is-- we will reach the day when each cell phone will be perfect, or as perfect as a landline. >> that's exactly right. [ticking] >> coming up, where is cell phone technology going? >> the optimum telephone is one that i think some day is gonna be embedded behind your ear. it's gonna have an extraordinarily powerful computer running the cell phone. >> that's next, when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn. because you can't beat zero heartburn. woo hoo! [ male announcer ] prilosec otc is the number one doctor recommended frequent heartburn medicine for 8 straight years. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. frequent havo: thesales event for 8 straight y"sis back. drive" which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right
bedroom. >> i have to trust that my team is gonna get the work done in this environment. and the ironic thing about it is that it's that trust factor that actually makes them work harder for you. >> and just as long. >> and just as long. >> or longer. stacy, jason, and marissa say they often work more hours than they did before. not a bad deal for the company. productivity among employees in the program has jumped a healthy 35%. >> we can spread out our work over seven days of the week. it's not about-- >> but who wants to work seven days a week? why is that positive? >> it's my--it's the way i choose to work. >> but if it takes 70 hours to do your job, why doesn't best guy go hire more people? >> you know, i am a happier employee with the trust. >> you want to work the 70 hours. >> i love what i do. >> you don't think you're working too much? >> no. >> do you? >> no. >> do you? >> no. >> you're brainwashed. [laughter] >> maybe we're all crazy. >> maybe we are. >> maybe they are. they don't even make more money for the longer hours. [clock ticking] next up, even with job sharing, it's h
and restaurants to suit every taste and nationality. >> part of the concept was to create an environment, when people came in, they didn't feel like they were in a hospital. >> what's wrong with-- i mean, this is a hospital. what's wrong with looking like a hospital? >> 'cause nobody really wants to go to a hospital. >> would you go back? >> oh, i'm going back this fall, yeah. >> why? >> i'm going back to see my doctor and have a checkup again. > he'll have to take a 22-hour flight. but there's even an upside to that. is it true that i can pay for a checkup with frequent flyer miles? >> well, we do have a very unique relationship with thai airways. so you can buy a ticket, you can use frequent flyer mileage to get your check-up. >> whatever it takes to get your business. >> and this is not the only hospital trying to outsource healthcare, is it? >> oh, my goodness, no. [chuckles] yes, we certainly have not gone unnoticed. there are hospitals throughout asia, throughout india. >> up next, india competes for the market in foreign patients. >> that's the ambition, that india should become the wor
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3